Wednesday, July 30, 2014

vorobey008:

From Deadwood to Justified

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The gif set I’ve waited for my whole life.

Monday, July 28, 2014

theparisreview:

“It’s the story of what it means to live in a cultural climate that stifles almost every creative impulse, and why it so often seems we should stop trying.”

Dan Piepenbring on Cory Arcangel’s new book, Working on My Novel, a compilation of tweets from people who are putatively at work on novels.

I will never get tired of this song, this video, or Neko’s coat.

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

Thursday, July 17, 2014
hallekiefer:

unforgettabledetritus:


A few years ago, after reading in a book that people who feel a strong sense of community have been proven to lead longer and happier lives, Bamford started working to overcome her natural shyness and fear of interaction by saying hello to her neighbors in Eagle Rock, a diverse and partly gentrified area on the northeastern edge of Los Angeles. She bought a park bench and had it installed on the median strip in front of her house. She then spray-stenciled the words “Have a Seat!” on the sidewalk in front of it. To her delight, the bench is often occupied. “It’s like a bird feeder for humans,” she says.

—The Weird, Scary, and Ingenious Brain of Maria Bamford

I love her and I love this!

hallekiefer:

unforgettabledetritus:

A few years ago, after reading in a book that people who feel a strong sense of community have been proven to lead longer and happier lives, Bamford started working to overcome her natural shyness and fear of interaction by saying hello to her neighbors in Eagle Rock, a diverse and partly gentrified area on the northeastern edge of Los Angeles. She bought a park bench and had it installed on the median strip in front of her house. She then spray-stenciled the words “Have a Seat!” on the sidewalk in front of it. To her delight, the bench is often occupied. “It’s like a bird feeder for humans,” she says.

The Weird, Scary, and Ingenious Brain of Maria Bamford

I love her and I love this!

Wednesday, July 9, 2014
thegetty:

Peaks of downtown Los Angeles’ skyscrapers are framed by the construction of the I-105 freeway meeting the 110. Known as the “Century Freeway,” the 105 was part of the Caltrans 1960s master plan for the freeways in California. However, construction didn’t begin until the 1980s and was not completed until 1993. What did the 110 look like in the 1960s? The Huntington knows.
We’re teaming up The Huntington’s tumblr to bring you historic Los Angeles images on Wednesdays through August 6 as part of No Further West.
[View North, I-105 at I-110, Los Angeles, January 15, 1991], 1991, John Humble. © John Humble, Courtesy of Jan Kesner Gallery. J. Paul Getty Museum.

thegetty:

Peaks of downtown Los Angeles’ skyscrapers are framed by the construction of the I-105 freeway meeting the 110. Known as the “Century Freeway,” the 105 was part of the Caltrans 1960s master plan for the freeways in California. However, construction didn’t begin until the 1980s and was not completed until 1993. What did the 110 look like in the 1960s? The Huntington knows.

We’re teaming up The Huntington’s tumblr to bring you historic Los Angeles images on Wednesdays through August 6 as part of No Further West.

[View North, I-105 at I-110, Los Angeles, January 15, 1991], 1991, John Humble. © John Humble, Courtesy of Jan Kesner Gallery. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Monday, July 7, 2014

I’m sure there will come a time when I get tired of listening nearly exclusively to Dan Bejar projects, but it hasn’t happened yet.

(Source: Spotify)