Tuesday, September 30, 2014
lareviewofbooks:

"At the level of the story, Transparent asks what happens to a family when one of its foundational parts reveals itself to be something unexpected. It’s about that revelation, about that process of self-discovery and identification, but it’s also about the relationality within the group.”

Transparent: Season 1 by Phillip Maciak

That’s Not the Way it Feels: ‘Transparent’’s Ensemble

Seriously excellent.

lareviewofbooks:

"At the level of the story, Transparent asks what happens to a family when one of its foundational parts reveals itself to be something unexpected. It’s about that revelation, about that process of self-discovery and identification, but it’s also about the relationality within the group.”

Transparent: Season 1 by Phillip Maciak

That’s Not the Way it Feels: ‘Transparent’’s Ensemble

Seriously excellent.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
purepopfornowpeople:

Time is a flat circle.

purepopfornowpeople:

Time is a flat circle.

Monday, September 15, 2014
nybg:

earthstory:

REFRIGERATOR TREESFound along the North American coastline from British Columbia to Baja California, Pacific madrone trees (Arbutus menziesii) are well known for their beauty, but more often are known for being cold to the touch. The madrone tree’s bark makes it easily identified, with smooth orange-red bark that peels and curls as it ages, and eventually falls off, leaving its inner bark (often a pale green) bare and visible. Even on hot days, madrones still feel cool due to water running upwards in the trunk just beneath the bark layer. Often also referred to as madrona, bearberry, or sometimes strawberry trees, madrone trees (and in particular, their bark) have been historically used to treat a variety of diseases by Native Americans, and are still used to make flavorings and tea. They, like other trees, require fire to germinate, and even hold an advantage during times of intermittent fires, due to their ability to survive fire and regenerate more quickly than some of their conifer neighbors, like Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Madrone trees are also known to be excellent for their assistance in erosion control, as their roots spread widely and quickly, holding soil in place along the erosion-prone West coast of North America. All around, pretty cool trees… pun certainly intended. BNPhoto Credit: Randell Zerr, as hosted by http://www.nps.gov/bibe/photosmultimedia/Plants-and-Animals.htmFurther Resources:http://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_arme.pdfhttp://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/sea/pugetsound/species/madrone.htmlIntroduction to Trees of the San Francisco Bay Region. 2002. Glenn Keator. University of California Press

"Dig a big pit in a dirt alley road / fill it with madrone and bay"
Tom Waits was my first introduction to the madrone tree, oddly enough. I think the lyric meant it as a smoke wood for barbecuing (and I’ve heard it does impart the faintest sweet, smoky flavor—just don’t take me at my word), though it’s more commonly used as a fuel wood for campfires and the like.
Beautiful, resilient, functional, oddly chilly. Pretty neat trees overall. —MN

I always called them madroños. They’re planted as firebreaks between sagebrush chaparral and houses, little sentinels next to cinderblock fences. They grew along trails on long backpacking trips as a kid, and we were small enough to hike under their branches for a bit of air conditioning in the  heat. 

nybg:

earthstory:

REFRIGERATOR TREES

Found along the North American coastline from British Columbia to Baja California, Pacific madrone trees (Arbutus menziesii) are well known for their beauty, but more often are known for being cold to the touch. The madrone tree’s bark makes it easily identified, with smooth orange-red bark that peels and curls as it ages, and eventually falls off, leaving its inner bark (often a pale green) bare and visible. Even on hot days, madrones still feel cool due to water running upwards in the trunk just beneath the bark layer. 

Often also referred to as madrona, bearberry, or sometimes strawberry trees, madrone trees (and in particular, their bark) have been historically used to treat a variety of diseases by Native Americans, and are still used to make flavorings and tea. They, like other trees, require fire to germinate, and even hold an advantage during times of intermittent fires, due to their ability to survive fire and regenerate more quickly than some of their conifer neighbors, like Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Madrone trees are also known to be excellent for their assistance in erosion control, as their roots spread widely and quickly, holding soil in place along the erosion-prone West coast of North America. 

All around, pretty cool trees… pun certainly intended. 

BN

Photo Credit: Randell Zerr, as hosted by http://www.nps.gov/bibe/photosmultimedia/Plants-and-Animals.htm

Further Resources:
http://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_arme.pdf
http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/sea/pugetsound/species/madrone.html
Introduction to Trees of the San Francisco Bay Region. 2002. Glenn Keator. University of California Press

"Dig a big pit in a dirt alley road / fill it with madrone and bay"

Tom Waits was my first introduction to the madrone tree, oddly enough. I think the lyric meant it as a smoke wood for barbecuing (and I’ve heard it does impart the faintest sweet, smoky flavor—just don’t take me at my word), though it’s more commonly used as a fuel wood for campfires and the like.

Beautiful, resilient, functional, oddly chilly. Pretty neat trees overall. —MN

I always called them madroños. They’re planted as firebreaks between sagebrush chaparral and houses, little sentinels next to cinderblock fences. They grew along trails on long backpacking trips as a kid, and we were small enough to hike under their branches for a bit of air conditioning in the  heat. 

appendixjournal:

Psychology pioneer William James looking terrifically anachronistic in Brazil, 1865. 

appendixjournal:

Psychology pioneer William James looking terrifically anachronistic in Brazil, 1865. 

Friday, September 12, 2014
maudnewton:

First two sentences of Rebecca Solnit’s latest*: “The story of Cassandra, the woman who told the truth but was not believed, is not nearly as embedded in our culture as that of the Boy Who Cried Wolf—that is, the boy who was believed the first few times he told the same lie. Perhaps it should be.”
* From the October Harpers, in my mailbox today but not yet on newsstands.

maudnewton:

First two sentences of Rebecca Solnit’s latest*: “The story of Cassandra, the woman who told the truth but was not believed, is not nearly as embedded in our culture as that of the Boy Who Cried Wolf—that is, the boy who was believed the first few times he told the same lie. Perhaps it should be.”

* From the October Harpers, in my mailbox today but not yet on newsstands.

theparisreview:

“All American fiction is young-adult fiction … to be an American adult has always been to be a symbolic figure in someone else’s coming-of-age story. And that’s no way to live. It is a kind of moral death in a culture that claims youthful self-invention as the greatest value. We can now avoid this fate. The elevation of every individual’s inarguable likes and dislikes over formal critical discourse, the unassailable ascendancy of the fan, has made children of us all. We have our favorite toys, books, movies, video games, songs, and we are as apt to turn to them for comfort as for challenge or enlightenment.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

All American fiction is young-adult fiction … to be an American adult has always been to be a symbolic figure in someone else’s coming-of-age story. And that’s no way to live. It is a kind of moral death in a culture that claims youthful self-invention as the greatest value. We can now avoid this fate. The elevation of every individual’s inarguable likes and dislikes over formal critical discourse, the unassailable ascendancy of the fan, has made children of us all. We have our favorite toys, books, movies, video games, songs, and we are as apt to turn to them for comfort as for challenge or enlightenment.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014
vintageanchorbooks:

On this day in 1904, twenty-two-year-old James Joyce moved into the Martello Tower in Sandycove, outside Dublin, with his friend Oliver St. John Gogarty. Joyce only stayed with Gogarty for a week — and in October Joyce and Nora Barnacle would leave for Europe for good — but their relationship and the Tower setting would become the opening chapter of Ulysses.Source: http://ow.ly/BgZx6

vintageanchorbooks:

On this day in 1904, twenty-two-year-old James Joyce moved into the Martello Tower in Sandycove, outside Dublin, with his friend Oliver St. John Gogarty. Joyce only stayed with Gogarty for a week — and in October Joyce and Nora Barnacle would leave for Europe for good — but their relationship and the Tower setting would become the opening chapter of Ulysses.

Source: http://ow.ly/BgZx6

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

picklesandwine:

THERE’S ALWAYS MONEY IN THE BANANA BAG

Arrested Development inspired bag on etsy! Banana fabric exterior, and lined with cash print fabric!

Keep your stuff safer than Michael kept the Bluth’s in this cute little bag!

 (gifs via thebluths)

Available on etsy by Sandy BEE Designs 

 (gif via its-arrested-development)