Friday, September 12, 2014
maudnewton:

First two sentences of Rebecca Solnit’s latest*: “The story of Cassandra, the woman who told the truth but was not believed, is not nearly as embedded in our culture as that of the Boy Who Cried Wolf—that is, the boy who was believed the first few times he told the same lie. Perhaps it should be.”
* From the October Harpers, in my mailbox today but not yet on newsstands.

maudnewton:

First two sentences of Rebecca Solnit’s latest*: “The story of Cassandra, the woman who told the truth but was not believed, is not nearly as embedded in our culture as that of the Boy Who Cried Wolf—that is, the boy who was believed the first few times he told the same lie. Perhaps it should be.”

* From the October Harpers, in my mailbox today but not yet on newsstands.

theparisreview:

“All American fiction is young-adult fiction … to be an American adult has always been to be a symbolic figure in someone else’s coming-of-age story. And that’s no way to live. It is a kind of moral death in a culture that claims youthful self-invention as the greatest value. We can now avoid this fate. The elevation of every individual’s inarguable likes and dislikes over formal critical discourse, the unassailable ascendancy of the fan, has made children of us all. We have our favorite toys, books, movies, video games, songs, and we are as apt to turn to them for comfort as for challenge or enlightenment.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

All American fiction is young-adult fiction … to be an American adult has always been to be a symbolic figure in someone else’s coming-of-age story. And that’s no way to live. It is a kind of moral death in a culture that claims youthful self-invention as the greatest value. We can now avoid this fate. The elevation of every individual’s inarguable likes and dislikes over formal critical discourse, the unassailable ascendancy of the fan, has made children of us all. We have our favorite toys, books, movies, video games, songs, and we are as apt to turn to them for comfort as for challenge or enlightenment.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014
vintageanchorbooks:

On this day in 1904, twenty-two-year-old James Joyce moved into the Martello Tower in Sandycove, outside Dublin, with his friend Oliver St. John Gogarty. Joyce only stayed with Gogarty for a week — and in October Joyce and Nora Barnacle would leave for Europe for good — but their relationship and the Tower setting would become the opening chapter of Ulysses.Source: http://ow.ly/BgZx6

vintageanchorbooks:

On this day in 1904, twenty-two-year-old James Joyce moved into the Martello Tower in Sandycove, outside Dublin, with his friend Oliver St. John Gogarty. Joyce only stayed with Gogarty for a week — and in October Joyce and Nora Barnacle would leave for Europe for good — but their relationship and the Tower setting would become the opening chapter of Ulysses.

Source: http://ow.ly/BgZx6

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

picklesandwine:

THERE’S ALWAYS MONEY IN THE BANANA BAG

Arrested Development inspired bag on etsy! Banana fabric exterior, and lined with cash print fabric!

Keep your stuff safer than Michael kept the Bluth’s in this cute little bag!

 (gifs via thebluths)

Available on etsy by Sandy BEE Designs 

 (gif via its-arrested-development)

Friday, September 5, 2014

Since this is really just a poorly disguised Dan Bejar fan blog (/Jason Mantzoukas fan blog, because I’m still not convinced they’re not the same person), here is the best of his new songs on the new New Pornographers album. (The real best is “Spidyr”, an updated, Neko Case-featuring version of Swan Lake’s “Spider” from Enemy Mine)

(Source: Spotify)

natashavc:

Yale uploaded 17,000 pictures from the Great Depression. They are amazing! You can click through by region (SAN FERNANDO VALLEY SAD CHICKEN FARMERS) or photographers or by subject such as “IMMIGRANTS”. The photo above is “interracial activities at a Japanese work camp’.
LOOK AT THEM HISTORY IS A FLOWING PULSE 

natashavc:

Yale uploaded 17,000 pictures from the Great Depression. They are amazing! You can click through by region (SAN FERNANDO VALLEY SAD CHICKEN FARMERS) or photographers or by subject such as “IMMIGRANTS”. The photo above is “interracial activities at a Japanese work camp’.

LOOK AT THEM HISTORY IS A FLOWING PULSE 

Thursday, September 4, 2014
lareviewofbooks:

Reader, help the Los Angeles Review of Books win a $100,000 grant from Good and the Goldhirsch Foundation so we can continue to bring you the best in literary criticism, interviews, and more.
If you have thirty seconds, all you need is a Facebook or a Good account to vote. Go here. 
Thank you!

lareviewofbooks:

Reader, help the Los Angeles Review of Books win a $100,000 grant from Good and the Goldhirsch Foundation so we can continue to bring you the best in literary criticism, interviews, and more.

If you have thirty seconds, all you need is a Facebook or a Good account to vote. Go here. 

Thank you!